Mindful Training Solutions

323-790-4906

Allow the MTS team to partner with your school community on improving outcomes, balancing youth safety and enhancing protective factors.  Our training protocols provide academic professionals with best practices to foster success at this critical stage in a youths development.  These models focus on strength based prevention and early intervention methodologies.

Birth to Five Training

For pre-school teachers, day care providers and professional mental health clinicians to enhance knowledge of the unique factors that impact performance and health at this critical time.
Youth age birth to five and early elementary students experience a unique set of mental health concerns that educators must be aware of. Child incidences of attachment disorders, anxiety disorders, depression and aggression are often overlooked as it is subsumed that youth of this age don’t suffer from mental health concerns. “A newborn human, at once competent and completely dependent, needs to learn to live in the interpersonal world of his or her family and broader community, while at the same time the family is getting to know this new individual. Considering how complex and delicate it is, it is not surprising that the process may go awry.” (Johnson & Appleyard, 2010) Research indicates that early identification and intervention of mental health concerns in youth correlate to a better overall future prognosis across most mental health diagnosis. In this module educators will learn to engage in child care and classroom activities that support prevention and early intervention.

ADHD: What it is NOT

For teachers, day care providers and professional mental health clinicians to learn a strength based approach to understanding this disorder and learn strength based approaches to effectively working with these students.
Teachers and school officials play a key role in the diagnosis of ADHD. In most cases, it is required that they complete a portion of the diagnostic assessment questionnaire to evidence the youths’ functional impairment in multiple settings. In many municipalities across the state, we see a high incidence of medical interventions in the absence of strategic, goal directed behavioral interventions. The major concerns with the medical treatment approach to ADHD in the academic setting is that it is likely to improve attention and concentration in all people (one reason why the efficacy of medication cannot be used to diagnose the disorder) and it minimizes the importance of diversifying classroom environments, lesson plans and activities to support skill development in youth diagnosed with ADHD (interventions that are likely to benefit the entire classroom community).

Learning Disorders: What's Organic, What's Ecological?

For teachers, day care providers and professional mental health clinicians to learn a strength based approach to understanding these disorder and how to empower professionals with tools to enhance the performance capacity of students impacted by learning disorders.
Identifying deficits in learning prior to their transition to a learning disorder is a crucial skill for any classroom teacher. Robust and timely interventions have the capacity to decrease the probability that the deficits will reach the minimum criteria required for a diagnosis by a mental health or medical professional. Young brains display the greatest plasticity across the life cycle as they consistently grow and evolve. In the presence of appropriate interventions and supports, the brain may crystallize neuro-biological environments (through pruning and axon growth) that stop deficits from ever reaching the level of functional impairment associated with a diagnosis. Through an appropriate understanding of those environmental factors known to exacerbate learning deficits, educators are able to create classroom environments and meta-cognition exercises that support skill rehearsal and higher degrees of student insight into how they think and learn.

Environmental Factors that Foster Success

Educators will learn how their lessons and class assignments can foster resilience and assist youth and their families to develop strength based paradigms to minimize the impact of risk factors and bolster the strength of protective factors.
Factors like poverty, parental mental health, fatherlessness, food insecurity, substance abuse, gang affiliation and domestic sex trafficking exist across several demographic domains for all school aged children. Although this list is non-exhaustive, each factor has been strongly identified as a contributing force to negative mental health outcomes. Teacher education on how these ecological risk factors, the associated resiliency factors and the hidden protective factors work together to create a unique mental environment is crucial to mediating the resultant psychic injuries. Educators will learn how their lessons and class assignments can foster resilience and assist youth and their families to develop strength based paradigms to minimize the impact of risk factors and bolster the strength of protective factors.